Sin And Absolution: Part 2

When we look at John 3:16, it gives us the basis for our salvation and the absolution of our sins. God loved us so much that He gave His Son to die for our sins so we could be forgiven and be granted eternal life through God’s Grace. It says: to whoever believes.

The word Absolution comes from the Greek word dikaiósis. It is pronounced: (dik-ah’-yo-sis).

This means that our sins are absolved and we are acquitted. This process is also known as justification. We are declared righteous. We are given divine approval. This strongly lays out the full payment made by Jesus of the debt of our sins. This liberates us from all divine condemnation.

He was delivered over to death for our sins and was raised to life for our justification. Romans 4:25
When we ask Jesus to come into our lives, a change begins to take place. We go from being eternally condemned to being divinely pardoned. It all lines up theologically in our justification. We are legally declared righteousness.

How does forgiveness work? The Catholic church makes it to where only a Priest can absolve your sins during confession. When I was Catholic, I went to confession regularly. 

You told your sins and the Priest would give you a penance. Sometimes you said Hail Mary over and over. Sometimes they told you to pray to saints. Then you were forgiven. Never once was I told to pray to Jesus or go to God myself.

I left the Catholic Church after two years. I was in the Knights of Columbus and taught Sunday School and was being groomed to be a Priest. I give them credit for getting be back in touch with God and the ministry, but I had to find Jesus again. 

When Jesus died, he became our ultimate mediator between us and God the Father. When we sin, we can go directly to God and Jesus and get forgiveness before we can get even one Hail Mary out. The gift was not given to the Priest. It was given to us all.

To Be Continued

(C)2017JeremyBeagle.AllRightsReserved


Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: